Prevalence of osteosarcopenic obesity in community-dwelling older adults: a cross-sectional retrospective study


Kolbaşi E. N. , Demirdag F.

ARCHIVES OF OSTEOPOROSIS, cilt.15, 2020 (SCI İndekslerine Giren Dergi) identifier identifier identifier

Özet

In our study investigating the prevalence of osteosarcopenic obesity (OSO) in community-dwelling older adults and possible factors responsible for falls, we have found that prevalence of OSO is 10.7%. OSO does not significantly increase the odds of falling, whereas lower handgrip strength, ALMi and gait speed were independent factors associated with falls. Purposes The purposes of the study were (a) to determine the prevalence of osteosarcopenic obesity (OSO) in community-dwelling older adults and (b) to investigate the association between falls and possible factors in individuals with and without OSO. Methods Medical records of patients aged >= 65 years were retrospectively reviewed. Individuals were diagnosed with OSO based on their T-score assessed by dual x-ray absorptiometry, handgrip strength, appendicular lean mass index (ALMi), gait speed and body fat percentile. Comorbidities, history of falls, depressive state, medications and anthropometric measures were also noted. Results A sample of 460 individuals were assessed (337 females; 123 males) and 49 patients were diagnosed with OSO. There was no statistically significant difference in falls between the two groups (OR: 0.768, 95% CI: 0.409-1.440, p: 0.41) and the presence of OSO was not significantly associated with increased odds of falling (OR: 1.755, 95% CI: 0.547-5.628, p: 0.344). Handgrip strength (OR: 0.931, 95% CI: 0.893-0.971, p: 0.001), ALMi (OR: 0.799, 95% CI: 0.708-0.901, p < 0.0001) and gait speed (OR: 0.529, 95% CI: 0.283-0.988, p: 0.046) were independently associated with falls in overall group, whereas interaction analysis did not reveal any significant moderator effect of OSO vs. non-OSO in the associations between risk factors and falls. Conclusion The prevalence of OSO was 10.7%. OSO was not associated with elevated odds of falling, whereas lower handgrip strength, ALMi and gait speed were independent factors associated with falls. Further prospective research is needed to clarify the effect of OSO on odds of falling, in consideration with possible risk factors.