Turkish and International Students' Reaction to Compliment Responses


AKSAR M.

Multi-Paradigmatic Transformative Research in Education: Challenges and Opportunities, Türkiye, 01 Mayıs 2013, ss.1-10

  • Basıldığı Ülke: Türkiye
  • Sayfa Sayıları: ss.1-10

Özet

TURKISH AND INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS’ REACTION TO COMPLIMENT RESPONSES

Compliments as a speech act have been studied a lot by the researchers so far. Admittedly, they have a positive effect on interpersonal relations. Nevertheless, the response to the compliment might determine the effect of the compliments on interaction. The response to the compliment, for instance, might be regarded as ‘conceited’ and this might lead the interaction to be impaired and interrupted. This dilemma is emphasized by Pomerantz (1978): on the one hand, there is pressure to agree with the compliment; on the other hand, there is pressure to avoid self-praise. This study replicates the study entitled ‘British and Chinese Reactions to Compliment Responses by Spencer-Oatey, Ng and Dong (2008). The questionnaire used by the authors was translated into Turkish and conducted to 25 foreign students (out of 25 foreign students) and 25 Turkish students (out of 172 domestic students) at Istanbul Istanbul Medeniyet University. Foreign students were also fluent Turkish speakers since they live in other Turkish countries such as Turkmenistan or in neighboring countries such as Bulgaria and Greece where they live as immigrants. The questionnaire was conducted to find out the relationship between the complimenter and complimentee varied in power and distance (teacher-student, close friends, mother-son, strangers, unfamiliar peers) across the five scenarios, in order to check for the influence of these variables. For each scenario, five different responses were listed: two acceptance responses, two rejection responses, and one deflection response. Respondents were asked to evaluate each of the responses in terms of appropriateness, conceit, and impression conveyed (favourable/bad). Three 5-point Likert-type rating scales were listed under each compliment response, and respondents were asked to circle the numbers on these scales that corresponded to their reactions to that response. For each scenario, respondents were also asked to add some explanatory comments, if they had rated any of the responses negatively (circling numbers 1 or 2) in terms of the impression it conveyed (Spencer-Oatey, Ng and Dong, 2008).

KEYWORDS: Compliment, compliment response,

TURKISH AND FOREIGN STUDENTS’ REACTION TO COMPLIMENT RESPONSES

Compliments as a speech act have been studied a lot by the researchers so far. Admittedly, they have a positive effect on interpersonal relations. Nevertheless, the response to the compliment might determine the effect of the compliments on interaction. The response to the compliment, for instance, might be regarded as ‘conceited’ and this might lead the interaction to be impaired and interrupted. This dilemma is emphasized by Pomerantz (1978): on the one hand, there is pressure to agree with the compliment; on the other hand, there is pressure to avoid self-praise. This study replicates the study entitled ‘British and Chinese Reactions to Compliment Responses by Spencer-Oatey, Ng and Dong (2008). The questionnaire used by the authors was translated into Turkish and conducted to 25 foreign students (out of 25 foreign students) and 25 Turkish students (out of 172 domestic students) at Istanbul Istanbul Medeniyet University. Foreign students were also fluent Turkish speakers since they live in other Turkish countries such as Turkmenistan or in neighboring countries such as Bulgaria and Greece where they live as immigrants. The questionnaire was conducted to find out the relationship between the complimenter and complimentee varied in power and distance (teacher-student, close friends, mother-son, strangers, unfamiliar peers) across the five scenarios, in order to check for the influence of these variables. For each scenario, five different responses were listed: two acceptance responses, two rejection responses, and one deflection response. Respondents were asked to evaluate each of the responses in terms of appropriateness, conceit, and impression conveyed (favourable/bad). Three 5-point Likert-type rating scales were listed under each compliment response, and respondents were asked to circle the numbers on these scales that corresponded to their reactions to that response. For each scenario, respondents were also asked to add some explanatory comments, if they had rated any of the responses negatively (circling numbers 1 or 2) in terms of the impression it conveyed (Spencer-Oatey, Ng and Dong, 2008).

KEYWORDS: Compliment, compliment response,