Silent Sources of the History of Epidemics in the Islamic World: Literature of Ta'un/Plague Treatises


ARICI M.

NAZARIYAT-JOURNAL FOR THE HISTORY OF ISLAMIC PHILOSOPHY AND SCIENCES, cilt.7, sa.1, ss.93-148, 2021 (ESCI İndekslerine Giren Dergi) identifier

  • Yayın Türü: Makale / Tam Makale
  • Cilt numarası: 7 Konu: 1
  • Basım Tarihi: 2021
  • Doi Numarası: 10.12658/nazariyat.7.1.m0132
  • Dergi Adı: NAZARIYAT-JOURNAL FOR THE HISTORY OF ISLAMIC PHILOSOPHY AND SCIENCES
  • Sayfa Sayıları: ss.93-148

Özet

From 1347 onwards, a new literature emerged in the Islamic and Western worlds: the prtin or plague treatises. The literature in lslamdom was underpinned by three things: (i) Since the first epidemic was a phenomenon that has been experienced since the birth of Islam, taun has naturally been on the agenda of hadith sources, prophetic biography, and historical works. This agenda was reflected in the treatises as discussions around epidemics, particularly plague, as well as the fight against disease in general on a religious and jurisprudential ground. (ii) Works aimed at defining plague and dealing with various aspects of it tried to explain the disease on the basis of Galenic Avicennian medicine, within the framework of the miasma doctrine, thus deriving their basis from this medical paradigm. (iii) Finally, the encounter with such a brutal illness prompted a quest for all possible remedies, including the occultist culture. This background shaped the language and content of the treatises at different levels.