Lipid peroxidation markers in adult attention deficit hyperactivity disorder: New findings for oxidative stress


Bulut M., Selek S., Bez Y., Kaya M. C. , Gunes M., Karababa F., ...Daha Fazla

PSYCHIATRY RESEARCH, cilt.209, ss.638-642, 2013 (SCI İndekslerine Giren Dergi) identifier identifier identifier

  • Cilt numarası: 209 Konu: 3
  • Basım Tarihi: 2013
  • Doi Numarası: 10.1016/j.psychres.2013.02.025
  • Dergi Adı: PSYCHIATRY RESEARCH
  • Sayfa Sayıları: ss.638-642

Özet

Malondialdehyde (MDA) is a reliable marker of lipid peroxidation where paraoxonase and arylesterase are two enzymes against it. Although increased MDA has been previously shown in adults with attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (A-ADHD), levels of paraoxonase and arylesterase enzymes have not been studied yet. We aimed to determine the status of both MDA level and paraoxonase and arylesterase enzyme activities in A-ADHD patients. A total of 35 adults with ADHD diagnosis according to Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders fourth edition (DSM-IV) criteria and 29 healthy volunteers were included in the study. Serum MDA, paraoxonase and arylesterase levels of the participants were measured. The disease severity of the patients was determined by using Turgay's Adult Attention Deficit Disorder/Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADD/ADHD) DSM IV Based Diagnostic Screening and Rating Scale. The serum MDA level of patients was significantly higher than that of healthy control subjects, whereas their paraoxonase and arylesterase levels were significantly lower. There was no correlation between the levels of biochemical parameters (MDA, paraoxonase and arylesterase) and the disease severity. Sub-types of A-ADHD were similar in terms of these biochemical parameters. Increased lipid peroxidation, a part of oxidative stress, in adults with ADHD appears to be unbuffered by antioxidant enzymes, namely paraoxonase and arylesterase. (C) 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.
Malondialdehyde (MDA) is a reliable marker of lipid peroxidation where
paraoxonase and arylesterase are two enzymes against it. Although increased MDA
has been previously shown in adults with attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder
(A-ADHD), levels of paraoxonase and arylesterase enzymes have not been studied
yet. We aimed to determine the status of both MDA level and paraoxonase and
arylesterase enzyme activities in A-ADHD patients. A total of 35 adults with ADHD
diagnosis according to Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders
fourth edition (DSM-IV) criteria and 29 healthy volunteers were included in the
study. Serum MDA, paraoxonase and arylesterase levels of the participants were
measured. The disease severity of the patients was determined by using Turgay's
Adult Attention Deficit Disorder/Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder
(ADD/ADHD) DSM IV Based Diagnostic Screening and Rating Scale. The serum MDA
level of patients was significantly higher than that of healthy control subjects,
whereas their paraoxonase and arylesterase levels were significantly lower. There
was no correlation between the levels of biochemical parameters (MDA, paraoxonase
and arylesterase) and the disease severity. Sub-types of A-ADHD were similar in
terms of these biochemical parameters. Increased lipid peroxidation, a part of
oxidative stress, in adults with ADHD appears to be unbuffered by antioxidant
enzymes, namely paraoxonase and arylesterase.