Antibiotic resistance in acne: changes, consequences and concerns


KARADAĞ A. S. , Kayiran M. A. , Wu C., Chen W., Parish L. C.

JOURNAL OF THE EUROPEAN ACADEMY OF DERMATOLOGY AND VENEREOLOGY, 2020 (SCI İndekslerine Giren Dergi) identifier identifier identifier

  • Cilt numarası:
  • Basım Tarihi: 2020
  • Doi Numarası: 10.1111/jdv.16686
  • Dergi Adı: JOURNAL OF THE EUROPEAN ACADEMY OF DERMATOLOGY AND VENEREOLOGY

Özet

Antibiotic resistance in acne was first observed in the 1970s and has been a major concern in dermatology since the 1980s. The resistance rates and types of antimicrobials have subsequently shown great variations in regions and countries. Illustrative of this is the resistance to topical erythromycin and clindamycin which continues to be a problem worldwide, while resistance to systemic treatment with tetracyclines has remained low during the past decade. The resistance for the newer macrolides like azithromycin and clarithromycin has been increasing. The results of antibiotic resistance may include treatment failure of acne, disturbance of skin microbiota, induction of opportunistic pathogens locally and systemically, and dissemination of resistant strains to both healthcare personnel and the general population. The ensuing complications, such as aggravated opportunistic infections caused byPropionibacterium acnesand the emergence of multiresistant superbugs, have not yet been confirmed.